Thursday, March 8, 2018

The gift

luckylefty.com/left-handed-pianos
I just finished watching an episode of the TV show M*A*S*H* and an interaction in the story hit home for me.

In this episode titled "Morale Victory", Hawkeye and BJ are put in charge of morale in the camp. True to form, the story is interrupted by the war. Incoming casualties become the priority. 

One particular soldier had his leg severely damaged, but because of the skill of Dr. Charles Emerson Winchester III, he is able to save the leg rather than amputate, but the patient suffers irreparable damage to his right hand. As Dr. Winchester is consoling the patient about his leg, the patient asks "What happened to my hand?" He revealed he was a concert pianist. He had no use for his legs. His hands were his life.

Why am I telling you this story? Because it drives home a point. I honestly do not know if I can make the point more clearly than the writers to the show when they penned the script,

Charles: “Don’t you see? Your hand may be stilled but your gift cannot be silenced if you refuse to let it be.”
Sheridan: “Gift? You keep talking about this damn gift. I had a gift, and I exchanged it for some mortar fragments, remember?”
Charles: “Wrong. Because the gift does not lie in your hands. I have hands, David. Hands that can make a scalpel sing. More than anything in my life I wanted to play but I do not have the gift. I can play the notes but I cannot make the music. You’ve performed Liszt, Rachmaninoff, Chopin. Even if you never do so again, you’ve already known a joy that I will never know as long as I live. Because the true gift is in your head and in your heart and in your soul. Now, you can shut it off forever or you can find new ways to share your gift with the world–through the baton, the classroom, the pen. As to these works they’re for you because you and the piano will always be as one.”

The reason this strikes home to me is that I still, 4 years removed from my career, seek it out. This piece of the script reminds me that life changes and in the face of those changes, a person must realize that, although part of their life may be gone, it is only that: a part of their life. Life doesn't revolve around what you do or how you do it. Life is about how you deal with the changes. And that doesn't come from the external but from inside. It is the very "gift" that is being talked about in the script. The gift that is found in a persons head and heart and soul.

We all have a gift, yet every person's gift is different. What a shame it would be to let anything, including Meniere's Disease, steal that gift from us.

I have people who often comment on my "ability" to change careers with such enthusiasm and success at this point in my life. I don't see it as that amazing. It's what a person does when faced with challenges. You rise up and face them, or you let them beat you. 

Maybe that's my "gift". 

What's yours? Find a new way to "share your gift with the world". You may find it was the ultimate plan all along.

'til next time

Dennis

Just a guy trying to life with an invisible, potentially debilitating illness

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