Sunday, October 29, 2017

'round and 'round we go

reddit.com
"Describe your vertigo to me. I envision it as being lightheaded or dizzy."

"Have you ever laid down on a merry-go-round on a kids playground?"

"I've done that as an adult, but there was usually alcohol involved."

"Well, do it when you are stone-cold sober and have it spin for hours, sometimes like someone is walking it around in circles. Other times, like all of your friends are standing around it, grabbing it and pushing it as hard as they possibly can."

"For hours?!"

"Yes, I have laid face down on concrete for 3 hours, unable to move or open my eyes because as soon as I did the world started spinning again."

"How did you cope with that?! I imagine life coming to a stop while that takes place!"

"You spin, you vomit, you crash in bed. And remember, I have begged to die."

"How long does it take following an attack like that to recover?"

"I usually slept for 8 hours or more following an attack like that."

"Do other things bother you during that time?"

"I became extremely sensitive to light and sound, when I could still hear, of course. I know I have barked at my wife to shut up and leave me alone."

"I can't even imagine. When was the last attack like that?"

"Well, I have not had one of those knock me down all day since 2014. I haven't missed them."

"What do you think caused them to disappear this time? Is it diet? Treatment? Cochlear implants?"

"Honestly, I don't know. I did have steroid injections in 2013-2014. My last attack was around February 2014. It was my right ear that was causing all of the issues in 2013-2014 and I didn't get my right ear implanted until April of 2015, so I highly doubt that had anything to do with it. I seriously am starting to believe that I have burnt out. My balance is shot as a regular part of life, and the attacks are gone. When you burn out, it isn't that the disease is gone, but rather that it has damaged your inner ear enough that it no longer is capable of causing attacks. I would not be surprised that it is still active and destroying the rest of my balance in my right ear. I'm just not having attacks."

And that is how the most recent conversation about Meniere's disease with a friend went.

'til next time

Dennis

Just a guy trying to live with an invisible, potentially debilitating illness

1 comment:

  1. That's a very good metaphor for describing what's going on during a fit of vertigo. Mine have never lasted so long, but they were precisely that - spinnig, spinnig, spinnig, sickness, exhaustion. How wonderful that you have a friend who wants to hear about all this. Not everyone does ... my best wishes to you from Switzerland.

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